Community-Engaged Teaching in COVID Times

By: Alisha Stanton, Program Manager, Office of Internationalization When the COVID-19 pandemic confined us all to our quarantine spaces, one of the things I missed most was the freedom to explore and understand the world from my own experiences. Technology and media became important resources for finding information about what was happening globally. While technology provides access to more information, people and social media … Continue reading Community-Engaged Teaching in COVID Times

Public Reflection on Community-Engaged Teaching in Covid Times  

By: Benjamin Nourse, Assistant Professor, Department of Religious Studies I taught my first course with a serious community engagement component this past year. What are my take-aways from jumping into community-engaged teaching in the Covid-era? While many people have discussed the "new normal" of the Covid and post-Covid eras in terms of the increasing integration of technology into teaching and learning, I … Continue reading Public Reflection on Community-Engaged Teaching in Covid Times  

Clear is Kind, An Infographic

By: Kateri McRae, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology This reflection was completed during the 2020-2021 “Faculty Fellows: Community-Engaged Teaching in COVID Times” program. To learn about this year’s Community of Practice, please visit our website here. The program was a collaborative effort organized by the Center for Community Engagement to advance Scholarship and Learning, the … Continue reading Clear is Kind, An Infographic

6 Theses On Teaching During The Pandemic: Reflections and Provocations

By John Tiedemann, Teaching Associate Professor, University Writing Program  “[The professoriate] has only interpreted the world; the point is to change it.”   1. Teachers are endlessly resourceful. Funny, too.   If you don’t believe me, check out the Facebook group Pandemic Pedagogy, which sprang up spontaneously in March of 2020, when we all, suddenly, “pivoted” to emergency … Continue reading 6 Theses On Teaching During The Pandemic: Reflections and Provocations

Fieldnotes From a New (Read: Nervous) Community-Engaged Instructor  

By Robin Tinghitella, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences  If you’re anything like me, when you started planning your courses last summer, the prospect of the up-coming schoolyear made you more than a little bit nervous. We were facing new challenges, teaching in new environments (our homes), and supporting students who were likely to encounter or to have already encountered some very real and scary life situations. But … Continue reading Fieldnotes From a New (Read: Nervous) Community-Engaged Instructor  

Burnout and Turnout in the Time of Covid

By Heather Martin, Teaching Professor, University Writing Program  The term burnout was coined in 1973 by American psychologist, Herbert Freudenberger, when he noticed changes in “mood, attitude, motivation, and personality” among healthcare workers at the busy healthcare clinic where he worked. The concept resonated and exploded into common parlance, quickly coming to “convey a great … Continue reading Burnout and Turnout in the Time of Covid

Engaged Students, Course Design, and Child Welfare as Course Topic: Reflections from a Community Partner, University Professor, and Communication Studies Undergraduate Students  

By: Elizabeth Suter, Professor, Communication Studies & Lauren Dartt, Tennyson Center for Children Across the 2020-2021 academic year, we, Lauren Dartt and Eliza(beth) Suter, collaboratively developed a community-engaged project. Lauren is Director of Marketing & Communications for Tennyson Center for Children, a non-profit serving children and families in Colorado impacted by trauma from child neglect and abuse. Beth is a Professor in the … Continue reading Engaged Students, Course Design, and Child Welfare as Course Topic: Reflections from a Community Partner, University Professor, and Communication Studies Undergraduate Students  

Three Take-Aways From My Year as a Community-Engaged Teaching Fellow During COVID 

By: Nadia Kaneva, Associate Professor, Media, Film and Journalism Studies In early October 2020, as I stumbled through a second quarter of teaching remotely from my kitchen table and living in near total isolation, an email from DU’s Center for Community Engagement to advance Scholarship and Learning (CCESL) delivered a spark of hope to my inbox. “Apply to … Continue reading Three Take-Aways From My Year as a Community-Engaged Teaching Fellow During COVID 

Connecting Change Makers: Story Mapping Nature with Youth in Boulder County, and Going Virtual

By: Corey Martz, PhD Candidate, Department of Geography Back in 2019, I began a story mapping project in partnership with Nature Kids/Jóvenes de la Naturaleza (NKJN) and more than 50 youth NKJN participants (check out this previous article about the story mapping project). A DU Scholar Shop organization, NKJN is a collective impact initiative with … Continue reading Connecting Change Makers: Story Mapping Nature with Youth in Boulder County, and Going Virtual

Bridging Learning and Doing: Colorado Quechua Cultural Outreach/ Peruvian Sheepherder Project

By: Alison Krögel, Associate Professor, Andean Literary and Cultural Studies; Department of Spanish Language, Literary & Cultural Studies (SLLCS) Since 2013, I have collaborated with various organizations on issues related to Peruvian sheepherders who work in remote regions of Colorado and the Rocky Mountain West under the auspices of the H-2A temporary agricultural worker visa … Continue reading Bridging Learning and Doing: Colorado Quechua Cultural Outreach/ Peruvian Sheepherder Project